Eosinophils- Definition, Structure, Immunity and Functions

Eosinophils

What are Eosinophils? Definition of Eosinophils Eosinophils are motile phagocytic cells that play an important homeostatic role in providing defense against parasitic infections. Eosinophils are bone marrow-derived granulocytes that remain in the bloodstream for a shorter period of time and mostly reside in tissues. The functions of eosinophils are multifaceted, including antigen presentation, the release of peptides, lipids, and cytokine …

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Buffy Coat- Definition, Preparation, Uses

Buffy Coat

Buffy Coat Definition A buffy coat suspension is a concentrated suspension of leukocytes and platelets that make up a part of the anticoagulated blood sample obtained by the process of density gradient centrifugation. The term buffy coat arose from the fact that the suspension has a color (yellowish beige) that is similar to buff. Buffy coats primarily contain white blood …

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Campylobacter Blood Agar (CVA)

Campylobacter Blood Agar (CVA)

Campylobacter Blood Agar (CVA) is a selective medium used for the primary isolation of Campylobacter jejuni from stool specimens. Dekeyser et al. reported the isolation of Campylobacter jejuni from the feces of patients with diarrhea and acute gastroenteritis by using a filtration technique and a selective medium with antimicrobials to suppress the normal enteric flora whereas, in 1977, Skirrow reported a selective …

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Columbia Agar with 5% Sheep Blood

Columbia Agar with 5% Sheep Blood

Columbia Agar with 5% Sheep blood is highly nutritious general purpose medium for the isolation and cultivation of the non-fastidious and fastidious microorganisms from various clinical specimens and non-clinical specimens of public health importance.  Columbia Blood Agar was first described in 1966 by Ellner et al who incorporated animal derived peptone, enzymatic digests of casein, and enriched medium by addition …

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Rh Blood Group System

The second major blood grouping system is the Rhesus (Rh) system. Philip Levine, in 1939, discovered that the sera of most women who gave birth to infants with hemolytic disease contained an antibody that reacted with the red cells of the infant and with the red cells of 85% of Caucasians. In 1940, Landsteiner and Wiener injected blood from the …

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